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Meet the Doctor

Javier A. Pou, MD, FACG

Dr. Pou has performed thousands of colonoscopies and EGDs. He is an experienced specialist committed to quality and patient safety.

Through our investment in training and the latest technology, we are dedicated to providing our patients with the best environment for preventative and corrective procedures.

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Robert, Stuarts Draft

"I really liked the office experience compared to hospital. The nurses are so helpful and professional. When someone tells me they need a colonoscopy I always tell them Dr. Pou is THE BEST."

Loretta, Staunton

"I couldn't have had nicer people/staff to care for me."

Margaret, Weyers Cave

"I felt comfortable and well informed both before and after the procedure. Thanks to you all for the great job."


"Everyone was professional, understanding, and kind. Thank you Dr. Pou and staff."

Jo-Anne, Harrisonburg

Your facility was wonderful, and made me feel very calm, in particular Marie and your wonderful anesthesiologist. I am a nervous person in terms of medical procedures, and your entire team was so professional and calming.

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We are proud to be affiliated with these organizations (links open in a new window)

Screening Saves Lives - Reaching 80% by 2018
Javier A. Pou, MD is a member of American College of Gastroenterology [ACG]
Javier A. Pou, MD recognized by leading gastrointestinal medical society for eduction achievement Javier A. Pou, MD is a member of The American Gastroenterological Association [AGA]
Colorectal Cancer Awareness

Colorectal Cancer

The CDC's webpage on colorectal cancer in Spanish:

Among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon or rectum) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Every year, about 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and more than 50,000 people die from it.

Colorectal cancer
screening saves lives.

How Can You Reduce Your Risk?

The risk of getting colorectal cancer increases with age. More than 90% of cases occur in people who are 50 years old or older. Colorectal cancer screening saves lives, but many people are not being screened according to national guidelines.

If you're 50 years old or older, getting a screening test for colorectal cancer could save your life. Here's how:

What Are the Symptoms of Colorectal Cancer?

Precancerous polyps and colorectal cancer don't always cause symptoms, especially at first. You could have polyps or colorectal cancer and not know it. That is why having a screening test is so important. Symptoms for colorectal cancer may include:

These symptoms may be caused by something other than cancer. If you're having any of these symptoms, the only way to know what is causing them is to see your doctor.

When Should You Begin to Get Screened?

You should begin screening for colorectal cancer soon after turning 50, then keep getting screened regularly until the age of 75. Ask your doctor if you should be screened if you’re older than 75.

Some people are at a higher risk than others for developing colorectal cancer. Having any of these things may increase your risk—

If you think you may be at high risk for colorectal cancer, talk to your doctor about when and how often to get tested.

What Are the Screening Tests for Colorectal Cancer?

Several tests are available to screen for colorectal cancer. Some are used alone; others are used in combination with each other. Talk with your doctor about which test or tests are best for you. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends these tests to screen for colorectal cancer:

How Can I Pay for Screening Tests?

Many insurance plans and Medicare help pay for colorectal cancer screening. Check with your plan to find out which tests are covered for you. To find out about Medicare coverage, call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).

CDC's Colorectal Cancer Control Program provides access to colorectal cancer screening to low-income, underinsured, or uninsured men and women aged 50–64 years in 25 states and four tribes.


The preceding information is intended only to provide general information and not as a definitive basis for diagnosis or treatment in any particular case. It is very important that you consult your doctor about your specific condition.